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Smart meters & how they can tackle water leakage

  • Smart meters & how they can tackle water leakage

About the blog

Graham Mann
I have been in the Water & Waste Water industry for 30 years and formed a Water Consultancy business called H2o Building Services both myself and my team have built a wealth of knowledge and expertise Saving companies money on their Water bi
Schneider Electric
Idrica

Themes

With climate change an ever-pressing concern these days, businesses of all shapes and sizes can really help make a difference where our natural resources are concerned if they make a few changes here and there… and, with water supplies, installing a smart meter could really help tackle the issue of wastage.

In England, 3.2 billion litres of water are lost from leaking infrastructure every single day which, according to director of water at Arqiva John Lilistone, writing for WWT Online, is enough to fill 1,273 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Figures from the World Bank show that GDP growth rates could drop by six per cent as a result of water-related stress on health, agriculture and income, stemming from the expectation that there is going to be a 40 per cent shortfall in fresh water resources globally by the year 2030.

Smart water meters have been recognised by the National Infrastructure Commission as an effective way of reducing water leaks and usage, and more households around the UK are now adopting this technology… but leakage figures have not seemed to change, which is being put down to the lack of an always-on real-time network.

Weekly readings from meters are considered to be out of date by the time they reach the analysis system, but fixed network meters can provide hourly readings in real time, which can help to reduce leak detection to under three weeks.

“With 300 million pieces of operational data collected per day, the water sector is an ideal candidate for a “big data optimisation makeover. However, delivering on this depends on a fixed network’s ability to quickly and reliably relay large amounts of data. A truly resilient network can provide a concrete surface for the addition of automated monitoring devices.

“As awareness around the world’s water scarcity crisis continues to rise, the argument for smart water meters has never been more persuasive. Behind the benefits of these devices must lie a resilient fixed network, for both short-term solutions and future applications,” Mr Lilistone observed.

As a business, automated meter reading can really help drive better water consumption analysis, allowing you to identify any issues with your network quickly, therefore allowing you to adjust your water-saving solutions in line with your requirements as they change over time.

You can see how much water is being used at hourly intervals by measuring water flow. If a sudden spike is seen, you know you need to check to see if there’s a problem, such as a water leak.

And if data trends change over time, it’s clear that your business demands have also evolved and efficiency strategies can be adjusted accordingly to ensure you continue to enjoy optimum savings where water is concerned.

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