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Tourism and water: Where in the world can you drink tap water?

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  • Tourism and water: Where in the world can you drink tap water?

About the blog

Laura F. Zarza
Degree in Environmental Science. Content Manager in iAgua. Smart Water Magazine newsroom. Fantasy and fiction writer.

Blog associated to:

Schneider Electric
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When we travel to a foreign country, one of the first questions we usually ask ourselves is what happens if we have a health problem while we are there. Access to health care tends to be different in every country and, so if there is something we can do, it is to not take unnecessary risks that can put our health in danger.

In this sense, one of the things that is often overlooked is water. As an essential resource, it is easy to forget that water, accessible by turning on a tap, is not always good for us. This does not necessarily mean that the water is unsafe or polluted. It just means that as a tourist, our body is not accustomed to the water of another city (let alone that of another country). Because let’s face it, who has not suffered from stomach problems by drinking water that one isn’t used to?

Taking this into account, Globehunters has designed a series of infographics with information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), on the countries where tourists can drink tap water and where it is better avoided.

According to these maps, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Russia, China or Morocco are among the 187 countries where visitors should avoid drinking tap water. The water of these countries is not necessarily unsafe, but could cause us discomfort if our bodies are unaccustomed.

Countries where tourists can safely drink the water from the faucet include Spain, United States, Canada, United Kingdom and France. Moreover, some of the major cities of these countries have also launched campaigns to encourage the consumption of tap water and to stop drinking bottled water.​

Source: Globehunters.

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