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President of Panama visits the Ing. José G. Rodríguez water treatment plant, built by Acciona

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  • President of Panama visits the Ing. José G. Rodríguez water treatment plant, built by Acciona
  • The President of Panama, Juan Carlos Varela, has visited the works site of the Ing. José G. Rodríguez Drinking Water Treatment Plant that ACCIONA is currently constructing in Arraiján District, Panama.

About the entity

ACCIONA
The water business of ACCIONA concentrates on water treatment and reverse osmosis desalination, a technology in which it is the world leader.
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The President of Panama, Juan Carlos Varela, has visited the works site of the Ing. José G. Rodríguez Drinking Water Treatment Plant that ACCIONA is currently constructing in Arraiján District, Panama.

During his visit, the President learned about the progress of the project, which was tendered by Panama's Institute of Aqueducts and Sewage Systems (IDAAN).

ACCIONA, through its Water and Construction businesses, is responsible for designing, constructing, operating and maintaining the Ingeniero José G. Rodríguez Drinking Water Treatment Plant, which will produce around 150,000 m3 of drinking water per day in its first phase. Its design also includes the future expansion of the infrastructure up to a capacity of 227,000 m3. 

The new system will take water from the Panama Canal and will benefit some 283,000 residents in the Arraiján District, one of the most populous areas of the country, in the province of Panama Oeste.

Once operational, the plant will help to improve the drinking water supply that serves the country’s urban population, one of the objectives set out in the National Water Security Plan 2015-2050 called “Agua para Todos” (Water for Everyone) launched by the Panamanian government. The plan includes the construction and/or expansion of new drinking water treatment plants, rural aqueducts and bore holes to cover 98% of the drinking water supply in cities and 70% in rural and indigenous areas by 2020.

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