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$23 million grant to improve water quality in New York State

  • $23 million grant to improve water quality in New York State

About the entity

Governor Kathy Hochul
Kathy Hochul is the 57th and first female Governor of New York State.

Governor Kathy Hochul announced $23 million in grants to help improve water quality across New York State while mitigating the effects of climate change. Through the New York State Environmental Facilities Corporation’s Green Innovation Grant Program, $20.8 million is being awarded to 17 projects that incorporate green storm water infrastructure, as well as implement energy and water efficiency measures. An additional $2.5 million in Engineering Planning Grants will help jumpstart planning for 56 water infrastructure projects. The funding is part of the $750 million announced for Round XI of the Governor’s Regional Economic Development Council initiative. Of the 17 Green Innovation Grant Program projects, 13 projects worth $17.9 million will impact Environmental Justice Communities. 

"To improve water quality for communities across New York, we must take action to ensure the resiliency of our infrastructure," Governor Hochul said. “These grants remove the financial barriers for local governments to invest in critical water infrastructure projects. New York will continue to prioritize funding for low-income communities and expand access to clean water, supporting our state’s economic growth and improving public health.”

EFC President & CEO Maureen Coleman said, “EFC is pleased that 86% of the green grants announced will have a positive impact on environmental justice communities. EFC is committed to awarding water quality funding to the communities that need it most. The planning grants are being awarded at an opportune time as communities begin to prepare for the federal water infrastructure funding, much of which will flow through the State Revolving Fund programs administered by EFC. Planning grants help fund the development of an engineering report, which is required in the EFC financing application process. EPGs help municipalities advance fiscally sound and well-designed projects to construction.” 

DEC Commissioner and EFC Chairman Basil Seggos said, “I applaud Governor Hochul and EFC for continuing to make significant investments in key water quality projects, particularly with a focus on helping disadvantaged communities. This will continue to ensure that environmental justice is represented in the green infrastructure and other improvements being supported by the State to build stronger communities and make a difference in the health and well-being of all New Yorkers."

The Green Innovation Grant Program (GIGP) supports projects across the state that utilize unique EPA-designated green stormwater infrastructure design and create cutting-edge green technologies. Competitive grants are awarded annually to projects that improve water quality and mitigate the effects of climate change through the implementation of green practices, including green stormwater infrastructure, energy efficiency and water efficiency. 

Engineering Planning Grants (EPG) help eligible communities afford and start the critical planning process so they can be better prepared to seek financing to help them complete their water infrastructure projects. Grants of up to $100,000 are available to develop an engineering report that identifies problems and potential solutions. These grants have helped municipalities across the state to complete 350 engineering reports since the program’s inception in 2012.

GIGP Projects:

  • Albany Water Board – $1,250,000 to install bioretention and a constructed wetland. These green infrastructure practices will treat stormwater and protect the water quality of the Hudson River.
  • The Mulford Corporation – $900,000 to install bioretention, stormwater street trees and downspout disconnection to treat stormwater at six Municipal Housing Authority Projects in the City of Yonkers.
  • South End Development LLC – $2,345,000 to install bioretention, a green roof, and a rainwater harvest and reuse system. These green infrastructure practices will reduce stormwater runoff in the City of Albany and protect the water quality of the Hudson River.
  • Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1 – $2,000,000 to reduce energy consumption at their Wastewater Treatment Plant through biogas production created by new digesters.
  • City of Long Beach – $2,000,000 to upgrade existing water meters with advanced metering infrastructure technology. This project will reduce water loss throughout the city.
  • Town of Pomfret – $135,000 to install water meters with advanced metering infrastructure. This project will increase water conservation by collecting more frequent and accurate readings.
  • City of Fulton – $1,030,000 to install bioretention, porous pavement and a riparian buffer to treat stormwater along the Erie Canal.
  • Barcalo Buffalo LLC – $530,000 to install bioretention, stormwater street trees, a green roof, as well as a harvest and reuse system at their new mixed use development project. The green infrastructure practices will help to improve the water quality in the City of Buffalo.
  • Town of Seneca Falls – $1,285,000 to replace existing water meters with advanced metering infrastructure technology. This project will increase water efficiency in the town.
  • Village of Pulaski – $285,000 to install water meters with advanced meter reading technology. This project will record water usage in previously unmetered areas of the village.
  • Erie County – $1,305,000 to install bioretention, stormwater street trees and porous pavement at the Seneca Bluffs Natural Habitat Park. The green infrastructure practices will help improve the water quality in the City of Buffalo.
  • Village of Mohawk – $1,550,000 to restore the floodplain of Minnow Brook. This project will further protect the resiliency of the Fulmer Creek watershed.
  • Town of Batavia – $730,000 to replace existing water meters with advanced metering infrastructure technology. These replacements will reduce water consumption in the town.
  • Village of Sidney – $480,000 to install water meters equipped with advanced meter reading technology. These new meters will encompass the entire village, which is currently unmetered.
  • City of Rochester – $335,000 to replace existing meters with advanced meter reading technology. These meters will increase accuracy and reduce water loss in the city.
  • Buffalo Sewer Authority – $2,925,000 to increase energy efficiency and reduce the use of natural gas at the Bird Island Treatment Facility. This project will provide energy and cost savings to the City of Buffalo.
  • Green-Wood Cemetery, New York City – $1,775,000 to install bioretention and a harvest and reuse system. This project will reduce stormwater runoff to the surrounding combined sewer areas, while also decreasing the potable water usage from the New York City Water Supply System.

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